Frequently Asked Questions


  • What are your office hours?
  • Where is your office located?
  • Where should I park when I come for my appointment?
  • How much do you charge?
  • Can I use insurance to pay for my appointments?
  • What should I expect from therapy?
  • How long should I expect to be in therapy?
  • What is your approach to therapy?
  • I suspect that my child may be developing an eating disorder, but she insists that nothing is wrong.  What should I do?
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    Q.
    What are your office hours?
     
    A.
    My office hours are by appointment only. I offer convenient weekday, after-school, and evening appointments. To schedule an appointment, please email me at info@drsarahravin.com or call me at 305-668-5755.


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    Q.
    Where is your office located?
     
    A.
    I am located on the 2nd floor of the Kendar Building at 1550 Madruga Avenue, Suite 225, in Coral Gables, FL. My office is within walking distance of the University of Miami and Sunset Place. Click here for directions to my office.


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    Q.
    Where should I park when I come for my appointment?
     
    A.
    There is metered parking on the street in front of the building. Be sure to bring change for the parking meters. You may not park in the parking lot in front of my building, as all spaces are reserved for tenants.


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    Q.
    How much do you charge?
     
    A.
    My standard fee is $180 per hour.  The initial evaluation for adult clients (ages 18+) is 1 ½ hours long and costs $270. The initial evaluation for child and adolescent clients is two hours long and costs $360. Subsequent appointments are generally 50 minutes and cost $180. I am flexible with my fees, and I offer reduced rates for college and graduate students and others based on financial need. If you believe you may qualify for a reduced rate, please indicate this in your initial phone call.


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    Q.
    Can I use insurance to pay for my appointments?
     
    A.
    No. I do not take insurance. You must pay for your sessions at the time of service. However, I will provide you with monthly billing statements which you can submit to your insurance company for reimbursement. Most clients with PPO insurance plans are successful in getting at least some reimbursement from their insurance company.


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    Q.
    What should I expect from therapy?
     
    A.
    Your first appointment will involve a thorough evaluation which lasts 1 ½ hours for adults and 2 hours for children and adolescents. During the evaluation, I will ask you a variety of questions about your history, your symptoms, and your current situation in order to get to know you better and determine how I can help you. For children and adolescents, the evaluation involves interviews with parents as well as with the patient. I may also ask you to complete written questionnaires to help me assess your symptoms.

    At the end of this initial session, I will provide you with my general impressions and we will discuss a treatment plan that best suits your needs. If we decide that I am not the best therapist for you, I will provide you with referrals to other professionals who may be a better fit for you.

    After the initial appointment, therapy sessions typically occur weekly and last for 50 minutes each. However, sessions may be scheduled 2 or 3 times per week for clients who need more intensive treatment. Once your symptoms have improved, the frequency of sessions may be decreased to once or twice a month.


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    Q.
    How long should I expect to be in therapy?
     
    A.
    The length of your treatment will depend on the nature and severity of your problems, your progress in treatment, and your personal preferences.

    In my practice, patients who recover from anorexia nervosa require an average of 28 sessions over the course of 17 months. Those who recover from bulimia nervosa or eating disorder not otherwise specified require an average of 15 sessions over the course of 10 months. Patients who recover from depression or other mood disorders require an average of 23 sessions over the course of 11 months. Patients with anxiety disorders require an average of 10 sessions over the course of 6 months.

    Some individuals may wish to continue with occasional therapy sessions after their initial presenting problems have been successfully treated for reasons of personal growth, stress management, and overall wellbeing.


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    Q.
    What is your approach to therapy?
     
    A.
    My approach to psychotherapy is individualized, collaborative, and evidence-based.  The specific treatment approach we decide to use will be based on a variety of factors, including your age, personality, preferences, and family situation as well as the nature and severity of your difficulties. My treatment techniques are derived from Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT), Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT), Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), and, for adolescent eating disorders, The Maudsley Method of Family-Based Treatment. These treatment methods are empirically-supported, which means that scientific research has demonstrated that these methods are particularly effective for treating certain problems.

    Success in psychotherapy requires an active commitment on your part. At the start of our work together, we will have a dialogue about which type of treatment best suits your needs. I will provide you with information and reading materials about your particular problem and the treatment approach we are using so that you will be fully informed.

    In order for therapy to be most successful, you will be required to work on assignments between sessions. For example, I may recommend relaxation exercises, journaling, or other coping strategies for you to practice at home.


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    Q.
    I suspect that my child may be developing an eating disorder, but she insists that nothing is wrong.  What should I do?
     
    A.
    Trust your parental instincts. If you suspect that your child has a problem, you are probably correct. Individuals with eating disorders are usually unable to recognize their symptoms and they typically deny that there is anything wrong. However, this denial is a symptom of the illness, NOT an indication that there is no problem. Your child did not “choose” to get an eating disorder any more than you would “choose” to get an ulcer or a migraine headache. She cannot “choose” to get well on her own, and you probably cannot “talk her out of it.” It is important that you intervene as soon as you suspect a problem. Eating disorders have serious consequences for your child’s physical, mental, and emotional health, and they have the highest mortality rate of any psychiatric problem. Early intervention dramatically improves your child’s prognosis. As a parent, you can be your child’s greatest resource in recovery. It is your responsibility to ensure that she gets proper treatment right away, whether or not she goes willingly. I offer both family-based and individual therapies for adolescents with eating disorders. See the Treatment section of my website for internet resources and books I recommend for parents of eating-disordered children.



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